Hive

Hive is WFDD’s multi-tiered education program that, through storytelling, empowers young people (and some grown-ups!) to ask questions, think critically, and care about their community. It provides both content and revenue for WFDD. Though primarily youth-focused, Hive serves people ages 10 – 65+, through a variety of programs, including a summer student Radio Camp and Radio 101 classes embedded in local schools and colleges during the school year.

Young Artists Spotlight

Every spring, Valley Public Radio partners with local youth orchestras and symphony to host a 12-week-long series featuring live performances from talented student musicians from throughout the San Joaquin Valley. The performances are largely classical music,with some exceptions. Host David Aus interviews students in between their performances, and also serves as program producer. KVPR serves a wide and diverse region covering two markets (Fresno and Bakersfield) and Young Artists Spotlight is an opportunity to bring together our communities and celebrate the unique platform that Valley Public Radio brings our region.

Donate a Recorder

Donate a Recorder is a “give back” initiative that tackles a genuine need in our region while embracing the mission of WDAV – to build a community focused on classical music. Donate a Recorder combines fundraising, education, musical discovery and community engagement all in one initiative. When people make a membership gift on air or in renewal mailings, instead of receiving a CD, coffee mug, or baseball cap, they can choose the “Donate a Recorder” option as a benefit at the $100 level.

Delaware Public Media’s Generation Voice Program

In partnership with two public high schools, Delaware Public Media’s Generation Voice program provides innovative career-building opportunities for students interested in digital media. Students work with professional journalists to learn the highest standards of news gathering and reporting. In the past year, participants have written and produced features on colorism, teen vaping, youth immigration, and gun violence; they produced creative storytelling podcasts and a series of parent/grandparent interviews done in the manner of the StoryCorps.

Playtime Pad Research Project

The Playtime Pad Research Project investigates the effectiveness of tablet-based learning initiatives in early childhood math literacy, while providing access to the latest digital learning tools for students, teachers, and parents. Initiated by the College of Communication Arts and Sciences and WKAR Public Media at Michigan State University, the Playtime Pad Research Project is a unique partnership connecting PBS KIDS, the College of Education at MSU, and the Lansing School District.

Where Radio Is Real

WRIR 97.3 FM, Richmond Independent Radio, Project ”Where Radio Is Real” addresses the lack of diversity of voices heard on Richmond’s public airwaves by giving the community themselves the tools and experience to share their own stories on the radio. WRIR show producers collaborated with local nonprofits that serve African-American youth, LGBTQ and teen girls to teach them the ins and out (and science!) of audio engineering, storytelling and sound art.

Holocaust Symposium Archive Project

A recent survey showed 22% of Millennials “haven’t heard or are not sure if they have heard of the Holocaust.” Fifty-eight percent of Americans believe “something like the Holocaust could happen again.” Working with the Holocaust Education Resource Center, WVIA filmed the stories and recorded the voices of Holocaust survivors to share their stories with children in Northeastern Pennsylvania in the hope that “Never Again” will be a life-long reality for all.

Youth Reporting Institute

Each summer, WUNC hires a diverse team of high schoolers, gives them microphones and trains them to tell us stories about their community. It’s been a majority-minority reporting team in each of its 8 years. Youth Reporters are paid, and for many, this is their first job that doesn’t involve a deep-fat fryer or manual labor. WUNC staff host weekly career development sessions (with pizza and soda) to talk about working in public media. In 2018, youth produced stories about mass shootings, mental health, housing insecurity and why so many Hispanics in our community drop out of high school.

Illinois Public Media’s Democracy Series

Ahead of Illinois’ April 2019 municipal elections WILL worked with three high school classrooms and 80 adult community members to develop local candidate questionnaires that met the specific needs of municipalities in our listening area. IIllinois Public Media (IPM) partnered with community organizations on events that facilitated civil discourse, increased media literacy, democratized editorial decision-making, inspired civic action, and educated young Illinoisans. This “Democracy Series” was designed to demonstrate that public media is uniquely equipped to facilitate dialog about local concerns.