Profile of BBC’s Katty Kay

MarketWatch’s Jon Friedman profiles Katty Kay, a co-anchor on BBC World News and Washington correspondent for the British network. “Yes, BBC World reaches 281 million households worldwide,” Friedman writes. “But, like soccer, the BBC remains second-string, and probably always will be, to the tradition-bound American audience.”

More ‘Postcards from Buster’ on PBS

The New York Times reports on the return of Postcards from Buster, the PBS children’s series that was “attacked by the secretary of education, pilloried by conservatives, then abandoned by its underwriters” after a 2005 episode portraying the lives of real kids with lesbian parents.

GAO reports on Smithsonian’s TV deal

The Government Accountability Office concluded that the Smithsonian followed contracting guidelines in negotiating its controversial programming partnership with Showtime Networks, but the institution failed to provide sufficient information about the deal to policymakers and filmmakers. After reviewing the contract and Smithsonian internal policies, GAO investigators report that it’s too early to determine whether the partnership will limit filmmakers’ access to Smithsonian archives. Reporters for Associated Press (via freepress) and the Washington Post interpreted GAO’s conclusions differently.

WFMU, WXXI get grants from payola fund

WXXI in Rochester, N.Y., and WFMU-FM in Jersey City, N.J., received grants from the New York State Music Fund, which was created from settlements between the state and major record labels over violations of payola laws.

WETA May Fill Classical Music Gap Left by WGMS – washingtonpost.com

WETA-FM in Washington, D.C., might return to airing classical music if the city’s sole classical outlet, a commercial station, switches to sports news, reports the Washington Post. WETA abandoned classical for news/talk last year after losing audience for some time. The Post’s Marc Fisher praises the potential return to classical: “Finally, the notion that public radio exists to serve the public in ways that commercial radio cannot or will not crept back to center stage.” Meanwhile, pubradio consultant John Sutton calls it “a lost opportunity for all of public radio.”

The Scientist profiles Radio Lab

The Scientist writes up NPR’s Radio Lab. “People are still daunted by words like ‘physics’ and ‘biology.’ Say ‘science’ and they get a funny look in their eyes,” says co-host Robert Krulwich. “Say ‘Travolta’ and they know exactly where they stand . .

Winer takes offense at This I Believe plea for funds

Blogger Dave Winer says he submitted an essay to This I Believe, the series airing on NPR’s newsmags, and never heard back–until he got an e-mail asking him for a donation. “I poured my heart into the essay, after spending a year thinking about what to write,” he writes. “Now I gotta wonder, if I don’t send the money, will they consider my essay. Or if I do send the money will they run it?” TIB co-producer Dan Gediman apologized, Winer reports (scroll down), and NPR has tried to distance itself from the whole thing.