KUSC broadcasting classical show from Santa Monica beach

KUSC host Rich Capparela has taken his Friday show to the beach. Starting Aug. 23, the Los Angeles classical station personality Rich Capparela began hosting the Friday edition of his weekday show from his home studio in Santa Monica, with a view of the Pacific Ocean. Airing 4–7 p.m., KUSC at the Beach takes listeners into the weekend with music and information about concerts and events in the region. “The afternoon show with Rich has always been a great way to wind down after a busy day,” said Bill Lueth, USC radio v.p. “A classical show with that beach frame of mind sounded especially relaxing.”

Capparela has had a studio in his condo since 1991.

NYPR looking to boost coverage for classical station

New York Public Radio has applied to the FCC to acquire 90.3 FM in Ossining, N.Y., from community licensee Hudson Valley Community Radio for $400,000. The broadcaster plans to use the new signal as a repeater for WQXR, its classical music station airing on 105.9 FM in New York City. Ossining is about 40 miles north of the city, on the eastern bank of the Hudson River. The addition of 90.3 FM would expand WQXR’s reach to areas of Westchester County that were within its coverage area when it was owned by the New York Times. NYPR’s 2009 purchase of WQXR was a three-way transaction with Spanish-language broadcaster Univision that involved moving the classical station to a weaker signal.

Drop the stuffy presentation style for classical radio and the format will thrive

To the Editors,

I read Ben Mook’s Feb. 11 piece about the de-commercialization of classical radio with a mixture of sadness and muted happiness. The fact that the attrition has slowed is indeed a positive, but the stubborn misconception that classical music cannot be a successful commercial radio format is simply wrong and quite depressing. The problem lies not in the music — for, indeed, properly programmed classical music on the radio has been, and can be, commercially viable — but in the music-academy approach to presentation that dooms any attempt to draw in new listeners. Classical music can be day-parted and made accessible, probably more so than almost any other genre of music.

Ideastream recognizes WCLV’s Robert Conrad for ‘innovative and generous acts.’

Conrad, president and co-founder of the 50-year-old Cleveland-based classical music station, received ideastream's “Great Idea Award” for his service as a leading classical musical broadcaster, producer and distributor of cultural programming. Ideastream praised Conrad and his colleagues for ensuring that WCLV remains a treasured resource by donating the commercial station to the nonprofit ideastream, operator of WVIZ-TV and WCPN-FM. The transfer takes effect Jan. 1, 2013. “This will complete the transition of WCLV into the ideastream family and will give listeners who appreciate classical music on the radio as well as businesses, foundations and other organizations, the opportunity to support this institution,” wrote Conrad on the WCLV website.