National Public Radio, Inc., By-Laws, 1970

NPR's original bylaws were put into effect when it was incorporated on Feb. 26, 1970. ARTICLE I.
Name

The Corporation shall be known as NATIONAL PUBLIC RADIO, INC.

ARTICLE II. Offices

2.1 Registered Office. The Corporation shall maintain a registered office in The City of Washington, District of Columbia.

NPR Articles of Incorporation, 1970

These articles were attached to National Public Radio's certificate of incorporation filed with the District of Columbia Recorder of Deeds, Feb. 26, 1970. ARTICLES OF INCORPORATION
NATIONAL PUBLIC RADIO, INC.
We, the undersigned, natural persons of the age of twenty-one (21) years or more, and citizens of the United States, desiring to form a nonprofit corporation pursuant to the District of Columbia Non-Profit Corporations Act (23 D.C. Code Chapter 10), adopt the following Articles of Incorporation for such Corporation:
ARTICLE I.
The name of the Corporation is: NATIONAL PUBLIC RADIO, INC.
ARTICLE II. The period of duration of the Corporation is perpetual. ARTICLE III.

Public Broadcasting Service By-Laws, 1969

On Nov. 11, 1969, eight days after a quartet of public broadcasters signed PBS's Articles of Incorporation, they adopted these initial bylaws. See also the network's amended bylaws as of 2000. The initial By-Laws of the Public Broadcasting Service have been preliminarily adopted by the Incorporators to permit Public Broadcasting Service to begin to function under the laws of the District of Columbia. They are subject to ratification or modification by the Public Broadcasting Service Board of Directors upon its election.

Articles of Incorporation of Public Broadcasting Service

On Nov. 3, 1969, four public broadcasters, including the presidents of CPB and National Educational Television (NET), incorporated a new nonprofit organization to interconnect the public television stations, taking on those functions of NET. See also the PBS bylaws, adopted eight days later. We, the undersigned, natural persons of the age of twenty-one (21) years or more, and citizens of the United States, desiring to form a nonprofit corporation pursuant to the District of Columbia Non-Profit Corporations Act (28 D.C. Code Chapter 10), adopt the following Articles of Incorporation for such Corporation:

ARTICLE I.
The name of the Corporation is: PUBLIC BROADCASTING SERVICE. ARTICLE II.

‘I give an expression of care
every day to each child’

Probably the most famous congressional testimony delivered on behalf of CPB appropriations came from Fred Rogers on May 2, 1969. The young writer/producer/host of Mister Rogers' Neighborhood made common cause with Sen. John Pastore (D-R.I.), who chaired the Senate Commerce Committee's communications subcommittee. Public broadcasting was seeking an appropriation of $20 million, and the Nixon White House was proposing half as much. Margaret Mary Kimmel and Mark Collins narrate the scene in their book, The Wonder of It All: Fred Rogers and the Story of an Icon (PDF, scroll to page 20). "It’s a strange moment in the hallowed halls of the Senate," Kimmel and Collins write — "a grown man reciting a child’s song to other grown men, but by now they feel as if they, too, are complicit in Rogers’ mission."

The Public Radio Study, 1969

This study — partially funded by CPB and the Ford Foundation during CPB's first year and released in April 1969 — recommended creation of a public radio network and a national production center (a year before the founding of NPR), restructuring of the noncommercial FM band, and formation of a radio division at CPB to look out for public radio's interests. The study was headed by Samuel C.O. Holt, who later served as programming chief at NPR. Holt's recommendations are here. Summary
The Public Radio Study was funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and The Ford Foundation at an important time for the medium. We have tried to gain a feeling for noncommercial educational radio and its problems, to get from the station managers and others who work in the medium something of their attitudes toward their field and its future, and to make recommendations to meet some of the problems we encountered in our field work.

The Public Radio Study, 1969

Summary and Recommendations
This study — partially funded by CPB during its first year and released in April 1969 — recommended creation of a public radio network and a national production center (a year before the founding of NPR), restructuring of the noncommercial FM band, and formation of a radio division at CPB to look out for public radio's interests. The study was headed by Samuel C.O. Holt, who later served as programming chief at NPR. Jump to Recommendations

The Public Radio Study was funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and The Ford Foundation at an important time for the medium. We have tried to gain a feeling for noncommercial educational radio and its problems, to get from the station managers and others who work in the medium something of their attitudes toward their field and its future, and to make recommendations to meet some of the problems we encountered in our field work. First, we tried to put noncommercial radio in perspective in a period which has seen great changes in the roles of media.

Proposal on Formation of the Public Television Network, 1968

What kind of organization should interconnect the public TV stations? On Sept. 23, 1968, a little more than a year before the formation of PBS, two officials of the newly created Corporation for Public Broadcasting, Ward B. Chamberlin and Robert D.B. Carlisle, drafted this proposal for a new nonprofit network. INTRODUCTORY

The Public Broadcasting Act of 1967, and the intensive discussions that preceded its enactment, have given high priority to the establishment of a nationwide interconnected television network to serve public TV daily. To give this system dedicated and professional management in keeping with its significant objectives, formation of an independent organization will be necessary.

Public Broadcasting Act of 1967

Enacted less than 10 months after the report of the Carnegie Commission on Educational Broadcasting, this law initiates federal aid to the operation (as opposed to funding capital facilities) of public broadcasting. Provisions include:

extend authorization of the earlier Educational Television Facilities Act,
forbid educational broadcasting stations to editorialize or support or oppose political candidates,
establish the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and defines its board,
defines its purposes,
authorize reduced telecommunications rates for its interconnection,
authorize appropriations to CPB, and
authorize a federal study of instructional television and radio. Public Law 90-129, 90th Congress, November 7, 1967 (as amended to April 26, 1968)
Title I—Construction of Facilities
Extension of duration of construction grants for educational broadcasting

Sec. 101. (a) Section 391 of the Communications Act of 1934 (47 U.S.C. 391) is amended by inserting after the first sentence the following new sentence: “There are also authorized to be appropriated for carrying out the purposes of such section, $10,500,000 for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1968, $12,500,000 for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1969, and $15,000,000 for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1970.”

(b) The last sentence of such section is amended by striking out “July 1, 1968” and inserting in lieu thereof “July 1,1971.”

Maximum on grants in any State

Sec.