Tuesday roundup: Pew finds NPR listeners lean left; NETA honors members

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Fallon got in a dig on PBS at the Mark Twain Award ceremony Sunday. (Photo: Montclair Film Festival, licensed under CC BY 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons)

Fallon got in a dig on PBS at the Mark Twain Prize ceremony Sunday. (Photo: Montclair Film Festival, licensed under CC BY 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons)

• The Pew Research Center released a big study of political polarization and media habits Tuesday, and it breaks out findings about NPR and PBS. One in five respondents said they got news from NPR in a typical week, and two-thirds of that audience reported having “consistently liberal” political views. That seems to conflict with findings NPR has cited in the past: that its audience is a third liberal, a third conservative and a third independent.

Meanwhile, 17 percent of respondents got news from PBS in a typical week and in total reported being a bit less liberal than NPR’s audience.

• The annual National Educational Telecommunications Association conference is underway in Dallas, and yesterday NETA honored 20 of its members with awards for production, promotion, community engagement and instructional media. Read the full list here.

• NPR’s new program clocks are on the way, but as the news magazines transition in November, a few shows will stick with their current formats a bit longer. “Here & Now, Fresh Air, Fresh Air Weekend, and Only a Game will NOT implement new clocks on November 17th,” writes NPR producer Brendan Banaszak in a post shared on the blog of the Public Radio Program Directors Association. “The new clocks for those programs will undergo a collaborative review with stations before the new clocks are implemented. That process will begin after November 17th, with an expectation that the clocks to go into effect in the New Year.”

• The Washington Post clues us in about moments that may not make it into the PBS broadcast of this year’s Mark Twain Prize for American Humor ceremony, which honored Jay Leno Sunday at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C. Among them, a joke from Jimmy Fallon: “Jay Leno is a trailblazing comedian, who hosted The Tonight Show and kept it at number one in the ratings for 20 years,” Fallon said. “A man who has done so much for NBC that we had to celebrate his career on PBS.”