Pubcasting exec says “we’re embarrassed” at support, Adweek reports

Print More, the outspoken advocacy group at the forefront of all things progressive, has turned its home page into a petition opposing proposed funding cuts to public broadasting, and e-mailed its members to sign it. And pubcasting execs appreciate that effort, right? Well . . .

Several who spoke with Adweek “wish MoveOn would have stayed quiet,” the advertising mag reports. They’re concerned that the group’s support “will help opponents paint public broadcasting as a tool of the left wing, rather than a thoughtful, educational and often high-brow approach to news and culture.”

Adweek quoted one exec as saying of the assistance: “We’re embarrassed.”

But PBS President Paula Kreger disagreed. “When you look at the breadth of people talking about us right now, they aren’t all left- or right-wing crazy people,” Kreger told Adweek. “MoveOn is out there, but so are others. It’s a stretch to point to them and say, ‘See, they’re all one.’ It’s a polarizing time, and there are some people who look for these opportunities.”

  • Anonymous

    With a supporter like, Congress will certainly defund public media. Someone, except NPR who accepted millions from Soros, should runaway from MoveOn quickly and say that MoveOn and Soros do not reflect public media.

    Of course, no one will because most pub media outlets support the far left.

  • Julie Drizin/@JDriz

    Personally, I’m embarrassed that the head of PBS may have referred to or any of public broadcasting advocates as “left-wing crazy people.” Public broadcasting needs all of the support it can get, especially from grassroots, online and community organizers who actually have a track record of success, like Members of Congress who claim to care about deficit spending can’t pretend to be budget-conscious while they dump public funds into military programs the Pentagon itself is trying to cut, just to keep jobs in their district or please campaign donors. I hope that after public media wins this battle, we’ll begin the harder work of advocating for even more investment in public media, comparable to other industrialized democracies.