Association of Public Television Stations (APTS) Bylaws, 1998

These are the bylaws of APTS, as of June 1998, a District of Columbia nonprofit corporation that represents public TV in Washington. At that point, the group was calling itself  the Association of America’s Public Television Stations, or America's Public Television Stations for short. ARTICLE I. OFFICES AND REGISTERED AGENT. Section 1. Registered Office.

Mo’ better radio

Believe it or not, there's a stone tablet full of radio principles guiding This American Life. Ira Glass laid them out in a talk ...

High court upholds authority of Arkansas network in debate case

The broadcast decision that embroiled Arkansas ETV in a landmark First Amendment struggle ever since 1992 was "a reasonable, viewpoint-neutral exercise of journalistic discretion," the Supreme Court ruled May 18 [1998].The high court's 6-3 ruling overturned an Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals decision in 1996 that the state network had infringed House candidate Ralph P. Forbes' free-speech rights by refusing to add him to the two major-party nominees in a broadcast debate more than five years ago. "This is a great decision for viewers," and will let the network continue airing candidate debates, said Susan Howarth, executive director of the five-transmitter state network, according to the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette. "The majority opinion gives us as much or more than we thought we would win in our most optimistic moments," said the elated Richard D. Marks, attorney for Arkansas ETV. Marks had pictured the Circuit Court's 1996 decision as "a grave threat" to state-owned pubcasters that could undercut their ability to make editorial judgments. But the ruling included "a one-sentence affirmation ...

Ambrosino and Nova:
making stories that go ‘bang’

In the first of May in 1971, Michael Ambrosino sat at his desk at 25 Wetherby Gardens in London writing a six-page, single-spaced letter to Michael Rice, vice president for programs at WGBH, Boston. "This project in science," he wrote, "would begin to fill an appalling gap in PBS service. It would attempt to explain and relate science to a public that must be aware of its impact. "The strand would be broad enough to cover all of science and . .

Court gives WFUV fifth victory for its tower plan

New York state's highest court early this month unanimously upheld WFUV-FM's right to complete the radio tower on Fordham University's Bronx campus, despite complaints from the nearby New York Botanical Garden that the tower spoils the skyline. This was the fifth victory in various administrative and court appeals. For nearly four years the tower has remained half-built. The ruling by the New York State Court of Appeals upheld a local zoning ruling that permitted the tower. Remaining federal historic issues are being mediated between the university and the botanical garden.

Lehrer takes his own advice: make sure it matters to you

Two decades ago, Jim Lehrer and Robert MacNeil gave public television a kind of news program that contrasted greatly with the aims of big-network journalism, and the distinction has grown year by year with the decay of the network news divisions. Contributing Editor David Stewart, retired director of international activities at CPB, profiled Lehrer for a forthcoming book on the major programs of public TV. In 1970, on a steaming summer morning in Dallas, I walked into a large room of the public TV station KERA and met Jim Lehrer for the first time. He was seated alone at the end of a long rectangular table, its surface strewn with daily papers, reporters' notes, overflowing ashtrays and half-empty mugs of coffee. He was studying a clutch of wire service stories, shirt sleeves rolled back, tie pulled away from his unbuttoned collar — the city editor from central casting, I remember thinking.

Fred Friendly: ‘a tough man but, my God, full of ideas’

Fred W. Friendly, the legendary CBS News producer who tried to bring innovation to public TV in the 1960s and later developed a celebrated series of televised seminars on major public policy issues, died March 3 at his home in New York City. He was 82. "He was a great broadcaster, a great innovator, a great friend of public television," observed PBS President Ervin Duggan in a release. At CBS, Friendly worked for years with Edward R. Murrow, producing many of his appearances, including the milestone 1954 report that questioned Sen. Joseph McCarthy's anti-communist campaign and the famous CBS Reports: "Harvest of Shame" on the lives of migrant workers, aired in 1960. He was named president of the news division in 1964 and quit two years later when the network carried an I Love Lucy rerun instead of a Senate hearing on the Vietnam war.

Lancit and Truett

Seven years in a ‘dynamic environment’

Cecily Truett and Larry Lancit rolled the dice. In the spring of 1991, they took their production company and its best known product, and laid them at the feet of GKN Securities Corp., a small investment firm, which organized the initial public offering of their production company. By then, the Lancits had filled a trophy case with awards as producers of Reading Rainbow. But Lancit Media Productions' earnings were barely enough to scrape by. It was certainly not enough to expand.

The cast of the BBC's My Music game show in full pursuit of chuckles.

Funny and civilized Frank Muir: patron of Pythons and radio games

Hands-up, all those who listen regularly to My Music, the half-hour radio panel game produced by the BBC and distributed by WFMT-FM in Chicago to about 60 public radio stations in the U.S.

Ah, I see a hand there in the back. It's all right, you may remain anonymous. How many, then, have heard of its companion program, My Word!? Two more. Let the four of us leave the room to recall some favorite segments from these superb series, two of the most civilized radio programs on the air today.